IASTM treatment of fascial planes.

We often have patients coming in to see us with general pain and tightness in the flank, somewhere between image showing the lateral fasciathe armpit (axilla) and the hips.  The pain maybe very localised and due to a strain to for eg. to the lower ribs  (floating rib area) or it maybe lower down around the pelvis and/or be a secondary problem to a lower back injury.  Conversely it maybe higher up affecting the rotator cuff muscles causing shoulder dysfunction.

In recent years the importance of the myofascial system has been acknowledged and an understanding of the fascial planes, and how one localised area can affect, and be affected by other areas is important in our role as practitioners wanting to obtain the best results for our patients.

In the example (right) we see the lateral fascial plane on a patient, treating this fascial plane for any injuries on the side of the body will produce more effective results than just treating the specific localised injury on this plane.  Just treating the localised area only produces minor proprioceptive (sensory) changes, however treating this larger plane causes a greater amount of proprioceptive (sensory) to travel to the brain via the spinal cord.

The brain processes this additional (extra) sensory information and accordingly alters the status of the injured and surrounding areas. ( the brain is constantly monitoring the status of our bodies,  processing millions of bits of information every second) constantly causing various physiological changes in different areas.

The more information the brain receives the more effective it is at correcting any dysfunctioning areas and the quicker the body heals from injuries.  This is one of the reasons why treating the fascial system in conjunction with our normal treatments provides such excellent results.

stretching before resting fascil densification

Using Myofascial Correction is very effective in treating the myofascial component of injuries.  This very effective system uses instrumented myofascial release and IASTM (instrument assisted soft tissue mobilisation) treatment protocols.

image showing iastm treatment

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